Terms, Conditions, And Privacy Policy

Who We Are

Our website address is https://howtoprogramanything.com. It is currently maintained and operated by Novelty Factor, a working group of Original Pursuits LLC. This website and its use/perusal are bound under the Terms, Conditions, and Privacy Policy as outlined on originalpursuitsllc.com.

We note in good faith that Original Pursuits LLC strives to comply with all privacy regulations required of it while operating the Website. We commit to taking whatever actions necessary to achieve compliance if anything is found to be insufficient. It is not the company’s intention, nor any of the officers, to be in breach of any privacy laws and regulations and we hope in honor of this commitment that opportunities will be given to rectify any error or issue in the processing of user data.

NOTE: For complete and detailed information on the Terms and Conditions of Use and the Privacy Policies governing this site please see https://originalpursuitsllc.com/terms-conditions-privacy-policy/.

What Personal Data We Collect And Why We Collect It

Comments

When visitors leave comments on the site we collect the data shown in the comments form, and also the visitor’s IP address and browser user agent string to help spam detection.

An anonymized string created from your email address (also called a hash) may be provided to the Gravatar service to see if you are using it. The Gravatar service privacy policy is available here https://automattic.com/privacy/. After approval of your comment, your profile picture is visible to the public in the context of your comment.

For complete and detailed information please see https://originalpursuitsllc.com/terms-conditions-privacy-policy/

Media

If you upload images to the website, you should avoid uploading images with embedded location data (EXIF GPS) included. Visitors to the website can download and extract any location data from images on the website.

For complete and detailed information please see https://originalpursuitsllc.com/terms-conditions-privacy-policy/

Cookies

If you leave a comment on our site you may opt-in to saving your name, email address, and website in cookies. These are for your convenience so that you do not have to fill in your details again when you leave another comment. These cookies will last for one year.

If you have an account and you log in to this site, we will set a temporary cookie to determine if your browser accepts cookies. This cookie contains no personal data and is discarded when you close your browser.

When you log in, we will also set up several cookies to save your login information and your screen display choices. Login cookies last for two days, and screen options cookies last for a year. If you select “Remember Me”, your login will persist for two weeks. If you log out of your account, the login cookies will be removed.

If you edit or publish an article, an additional cookie will be saved in your browser if you edit or publish an article. This cookie includes no personal data and simply indicates the post ID of the article you just edited. It expires after 1 day.

For complete and detailed information please see https://originalpursuitsllc.com/terms-conditions-privacy-policy/

Embedded Content From Other Websites

Articles on this site may include embedded content (e.g. videos, images, articles, etc.). Embedded content from other websites behaves in the same way as if the visitor has visited the other website.

These websites may collect data about you, use cookies, embed additional third-party tracking, and monitor your interaction with that embedded content, including tracking your interaction with the embedded content if you have an account and are logged in to that website.

For complete and detailed information please see https://originalpursuitsllc.com/terms-conditions-privacy-policy/

Analytics

We use Automattic’s Jetpack software suite as well as Google Analytics to collect visitor and traffic information for our sites. For complete and detailed information please see https://originalpursuitsllc.com/terms-conditions-privacy-policy/

Image Based On A Photo by Cytonn Photography on Unsplash

Recent Posts

Negative Binary Numbers

A non-standard positional notation is one where the value of each position isn’t necessarily a straightforward power of the radix. I am also including when the radix is not a positive integer (such as -2), even though mathematically the representation is consistent with standard positional notation. By altering the interpretation of one or more of the place values (or the radix) of a binary representation, we are able to represent negative values. In this post I’ll be covering sign-magnitude, the most intuitive method, the radix complement methods (ones’ complement and two’s complement), offset binary (also known as excess-k or biased), and base -2 (base negative two).

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Binary (Base-2) And Its Operations

This article continues the trend of the previous articles and begins with a history of binary. After that, I briefly reiterate why binary is used in modern electronic devices as covered in the previous article, and go into more depth regarding binary “sizes” (bit, byte, kilobyte, etc.) Then I move on to important elements of binary arithmetic, and the operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. I cover two operations often found in computing processors, the shift operators, and their mathematical meaning. Finally, I briefly cover Boolean logic operations.

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An incadescent lightbulb burns.

Radix Economy

This article begins with a recap of where we are in the series in regards to the concept of counting. I review the definition of positional notation as outlined in the first article and then move on to reveal how we can calculate the number of digits a value will have in a given radix. In doing so I will go over two mathematical concepts relevant to this calculation: exponents and logarithms. I will then use logarithms to show how you can calculate the efficiency of a given radix, also called the radix economy, and answer the question, “What’s the most efficient radix?”

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A measurement chart in a shoe store.

Converting To Binary, Octal, and Hexadecimal

This is the second article in a series whose intention is to have the reader able to understand binary, octal, and hexadecimal; three radices of great importance to contemporary computer theory. This article builds upon the previous article by outlining three important radices (binary, octal, and hexadecimal) that are useful in the field of computer science. I start with arbitrary base conversion using two methods. Then, a bit of background is given for why these bases are important, particularly binary. Finally, we perform radix conversion.

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A man in darkness has computer code projected onto him.

Understanding Radix

This article puts forth a brief history of counting, which details how we arrived at some of the conventions we have today, including the notion of radix. It then explores the concept of radix in positional numeral systems, and in particular the concept of using radices of arbitrary values. With this foundation, it becomes a simple exercise to use binary, octal, and hexadecimal, each with a radix of two, eight, and sixteen respectively.

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A set of cathode ray tube based numeric displays.

Binary, Octal, And Hexadecimal

This series intends to have the reader able to understand binary, octal, and hexadecimal; three radices of great importance to contemporary computer theory. By the end of this series, you should be able to read and convert integer values into binary, octal, and hexadecimal, perform arithmetic operations on all three representations, understand basic Boolean operations, and otherwise have a further appreciation of the power of binary.

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